2019 Film Program

On March 30th, 2019, the Wild & Scenic Film Festival On Tour will stop in Red Bluff, California, for one night.

Be prepared to be wowed! Be prepared to have fun! Considered one of the nation's premier nature education and adventure film festivals, this year's Wild and Scenic films combine stellar filmmaking, beautiful cinematography, and first rate storytelling to inform, inspire, and ignite solutions and possibilities to create a positive future for the next generation. Festival goers can expect to see award winning films about nature, adventure, conservation, water, our changing world, wildlife, and agriculture. The films instill a deep appreciation and a sense of wonder for the natural world that surrounds and supports us all. This year's event includes raffles, concessions, and awe inspiring films from around the world and from our own backyard! View the Facebook page here.

This film festival is on tour and will be coming to Red Bluff's historic State Theatre on Saturday, March 30, 2019. Doors open at 6:30pm, and films run from 7 to 10 pm. The Tehama Conservation Fund value the film festival as an avenue to better community understanding of the connection we share with our planet and our role as stewards to keep it healthy for the next generations. 

 

2019 WSFF Featured Films

Tehama Conservation Fund

 

  1. The Shape of a River
    • At its core, The Shape of a River celebrates the Mighty Yellowstone as both partner and provider, ever-shaping the land and lives of those along its course and binding us to the very spirit of wildness. The film casts the story of the River through the eyes of those whose lives intersect with it in ways that run deep. Through them, we find a river that is fierce yet fragile, robust yet at risk. 

  2. Return From Desolation
    • For Garrett Eaton, a remote and rugged section of the Green River called Desolation Canyon is more than a river; it is a place that brought him back from the brink to reclaim a life he almost lost. At his core, Garrett is a river guide, but his story doesn’t start here. Returning to the wild rivers and canyonlands of his youth, Garrett found true freedom. With each pull of the oars, Garrett reclaimed his faith, his sobriety and most importantly — his family.

  3. Where the Wild Things Play
    • Friday night at the local watering hole and … where the ladies at? Answer: BASE jumping from high desert cliffs, performing tricks on slacklines, climbing granite routes, shredding singletrack, skiing backcountry lines and generally leaving you fellas behind. This rowdy ode to female athletes by Krystle Wright leaves no doubt about the state of women in today’s outdoor world: badass.

  4. Chasing Wild
    • Three friends set off on a 400km bikepacking and packraft expedition - pedaling through vast boreal forest, paddling frigid whitewater, battling monster trout, outrunning a grizzly - through the heart of the sacred headwaters in northwestern British Columbia, birthplace of three critical salmon rivers, and home to the Tahltan people. In the wake of the devastating Mount Polley Mine disaster, the team’s goal is to understand what is at stake as a wave of new mines are developed across this remote corner of the province.

  5. Imagination
    • We’ve all been that kid sitting in the back seat of our family car, wishing we were somewhere else. Through the boredom, the driveway snow piles, sidewalk handrails and stair sets start to tease our inner skier. Watch day dreams come to life as Tom Wallisch shreds the snowy streets of Nelson, British Columbia.

  6. A New View of the Moon
    • Become reacquainted with awe alongside strangers interacting with a telescope trained on the moon. Watch as Wylie Overstreet takes a telescope around the streets of Los Angeles to give passersby an up-close look at a familiar object: a new view of the moon.

  7. Visions of the Lost Sierra
    • This film examines the past, present, and future of the Middle Fork of the Feather River, one of the first eight rivers protected by the Wild & Scenic Act in 1968. Through the eyes of local Maidu, fisherman, and conservationists, viewers will experience this unique place and understand the hopes and dreams of those who are working to keep it wild.

  8. (Unofficial)History of National Parks
    • Want to know the complete story of National Parks in under four minutes? It's hard to do, but this snappy short gives it a good shot. The (unofficial) History of National Parks covers everything from their creation to the challenges they ensure and inadvertently create; and how they provide benefit to both individuals and society.

  9. Sky Migration
    • Each fall, our skies fill with the wings of migrating raptors, a migration that relies on two hemispheres worth of wild and healthy ecosystems. Join ecologist and filmmaker, Charles Post, as he shines a light on the network of back country scientists and sentinels at the front lines of raptor conservation.

  10. My Mom Vala
    • Life has a way of putting us where we need to be. For Vala, that's in both Greenland - where she works at her family's fishing lodge - and Reykjavík, where she teaches her daughter how to do it all on her own, too.

  11. In Perpetual Motion
    • Surfers and free divers know well those dark, lung-searing seconds waiting to surface after a wave has pinned you to the ocean floor. It can feel like an eternity. In those underwater minutes, Australian adventure photographer, Krystle Wright, envisions herself in a desert with roiling grey skies and bootpacking a snowy ridgeline, her trusty camera capturing the stunning dreamscapes. Vivid and ethereal, In Perpetual Motion, is about the remarkable beauty revealed when time stands still for just a moment.

  12. Your River Needs You
    • The Red River in Kentucky was slated to be dammed in the early 60s and young landowner Joe Bowen supported it. He even gave the speech in favor of the dam against Supreme Court Justice William O. Douglas and the Sierra Club. Not anymore. “In 75 years of living, I’ve changed my attitude about this wild river. The river is ours. So if it’s ours, then it’s also our responsibility. I want my great-grandchildren to see what I have seen.” In 1993, the Red River received Wild & Scenic River Designation.

 

Proceeds from this exciting event will benefit Tehama Conservation Fund. You're supporting our program development.

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